Music Software Review: Spitfire/redCola EFM RD01 Trailer Giant, Vol. 1

“Make Trailer” With One Click!?

Is Spitfire Audio‘s redCola Trailer Giant the library that enables us to instantly produce fantastic trailer tracks? Making money with one click? The advertisement is pretty impressive: Dawn of The Planets Of The Apes, World War Z, American Hustle, to name a few blockbusters that have been treated with this library.

The answer (spoiler alert!) is: No. There is no “Make Trailer” button, but you do get a lot of impressive stuff to produce great trailer tracks and more. 100 hours of compiled material are waiting to be heard and discovered.

The Library

First of all; you need the full version of Native Instruments KONTAKT to run this massive library. The sounds were developed by redCola and Spitfire, and housed within the eDNA engine, as part of Spitfire‘s Extended Family range (hence the EFM tag in the title). If you have a look at the manual, you can tell that there is more than meets the eye under the hood of  EFM RD01 Trailer Giant. The whole unpacked library consumes 15.9 GB of your hard drive. Is it worth the space? Oh, yes!

 

Installation

All you have to do is to install the Spitfire Audio Library Manager. The installation runs smoothly and without any problems. All you have to do is wait until all your content is downloaded. Since, uh, real men don’t read manuals, you’ll probably miss some buttons and faders, because it’s sometimes hard to tell if there is something to turn, tweak, or chose from. So, RTFM!

Patches

As in Omnisphere, artist patches in Trailer Giant can be rated between 1 to 5 stars – very handy. Most of the patch names make sense and give you an idea of the sound, and can cover almost everything you might need for your trailer (or any other musical piece). Additionally, there are many playable sounds to write melodic lines with. Of course, there are no real synths or strings, pianos or such. However, with some creativity, you can produce a whole trailer (or even a whole soundtrack) with this library. You are also able to create your own patches.

The Trailer Giant patches are organised into Factory and Artists folders, which are further divided into Collections and Individual.  If you are using the Artists/Individual patches, you only load the sounds that are required for these presets, and so you save a lot of memory. If you want the full package – go for the Collections.

Read more about how to use the patches right here.

Interface

The Trailer Giant  interface is nice and well organised. The only problem is that if you have a screen resolution of 2560×1440 like do, it’s really hard to read the names of the elements, and this is actually a problem that most interfaces have. Consequently, discovering all the knobs, dials, and buttons would need a bit of time (or a bit of reading the manual). What I also miss is a clearer control concept – some buttons don’t look like buttons at all, but rather like graphical elements.

redCola_images01

There’s a lot to tweak in Trailer Giant. You can mix and match all of the sounds, add some spice to it, and create something new. Each of the two sound sources has its own dials and parameters.

redCola_images02

Also a great feature: you can pre-listen to every sound by clicking on the play button next to the name of the patch.

redCola_images03

Even more stuff: The FX section. All that your heart desires from KONTAKT‘s included effects, right up there on the interface.

redCola_images04

The Gate Sequencer is another great tool. You can create stutter effects for each main source, and you can also swap the sequences by one click on the double arrow bow control. The possibility to stop on release is very handy as well.

redCola_images05

Feed the two Motors with the FX of your choice!

The FX department is powerful, but in my opinion, is “not a piece of cake” in terms of handling. Once more: the manual is your friend.

Manual

I really don’t like reading manuals (like most of us, I suppose?). But this one is a must-read. You can find anything and more in this thoughtfully written online manual. If you don’t read it, you might miss some cool stuff. So here we go.

Sound

Let’s face it. You’ll get tons of sounds in Trailer Giant. Over 939 sounds warped into 6,598  instruments and 84 presets. 3756 different combinations of sounds are possible. This is a big plus, but it can be also a tiny problem, because the chance to get lost is right in front of you, loaded into your KONTAKT player. The sounds are mostly very complex, so you don’t get only a simple Bang or Woosh. Let your finger rest on the keyboard for a while – it’s often worth it. Don’t rush while checking out the sounds, because sometimes surprises await. Expect the unexpected. It often reminds me of Spectrasonics Omnisphere, which is definitely not a bad thing.

The sounds in Trailer Giant are very well chosen, and not only fillers. You have the sub department that makes your place shake. You’ll get all the noises to drive your dog crazy. Of course, there a some sounds that sound familiar, but sometimes a Bang is just a Bang, and nothing more is wanted.

It’s hard enough to describe music in words, and even harder to describe sound FX. Playing around with this library feels like walking through a candy store, with nobody to stop you from eating and trying new flavours. And when you think you’ve had enough, something else grabs your attention and makes you want to taste it.

WARP STAGES:

  • Source
  • All FX
  • Distortion 1
  • Distortion 2
  • Harsh
  • Hollow
  • Silk
  • Space

CATEGORIES

  • Atmos
  • Drones
  • Flyby
  • Glitch
  • Long Hits
  • Loose Long Hits
  • Loose Short Hits
  • Moments
  • Risers
  • SFXs
  • Short Hits
  • Short Sub Hits
  • Sub Long Hits

FOLDERS

  • 0. Factory (Menu)
  • 1. Factory (Collection)
  • 2. Artists (Menu)
  • 3. Artists (Individual)
  • 4. Artists (Collection)
  • 5. Construction kits

Overall

The sounds in Trailer Giant are of great quality (and I can’t guarantee that I’ve heard all of them yet!) . The sound is more “artificial”, rather than organic, but this gives the library its own sound. Because of the vast mixing and tweaking possibilities, you will likely never run out of sounds. The many dials and knobs can be real time consumers, and perhaps some would consider them overkill, but all the patches that come with this library are ready for instant use. So if you are in a hurry, you can and will find something without any tweaking.

The great thing about Trailer Giant is that you not only get fantastic presets, but awesome raw material to produce your own sounds. This library won’t be “worn out” and “over-used” because of its abundance of options, always providing fresh sounds and ideas.

Value

No, Trailer Giant is not a bargain. And there are competitors on the market that ask for less. However, if you are serious about sound design and producing trailers, this will be a very tempting library, and a great tool in my opinion. Spitfire also offers also an educational discount of 30% for students.

You can purchase this library right here for £299.-

 

“Make Trailer” With One Click!? Is Spitfire Audio’s redCola Trailer Giant the library that enables us to instantly produce fantastic trailer tracks? Making money with one click? The advertisement is pretty impressive: Dawn of The Planets Of The Apes, World War Z, American Hustle, to name a few blockbusters that have been treated with this library. The answer (spoiler alert!) is: No. There is no “Make Trailer” button, but you do get a lot of impressive stuff to produce great trailer tracks and more. 100 hours of compiled material are waiting to be heard and discovered. The Library First of all; you need the full version of Native Instruments KONTAKT to run this massive library. The sounds were developed by redCola and Spitfire, and housed within the eDNA engine, as part of Spitfire’s Extended Family range (hence the EFM tag in the title). If you have a look at the manual, you can tell that there is more than meets the eye under the hood of  EFM RD01 Trailer Giant. The whole unpacked library consumes 15.9 GB of your hard drive. Is it worth the space? Oh, yes!  

Installation All you have to do is to install the Spitfire Audio Library Manager. The installation runs smoothly and without any problems. All you have to do is wait until all your content is downloaded. Since, uh, real men don’t read manuals, you’ll probably miss some buttons and faders, because it’s sometimes hard to tell if there is something to turn, tweak, or chose from. So, RTFM! Patches As in Omnisphere, artist patches in Trailer Giant can be rated between 1 to 5 stars – very handy. Most of the patch names make sense and give you an idea of the sound, and can cover almost everything you might need for your trailer (or any other musical piece). Additionally, there are many playable sounds to write melodic lines with. Of course, there are no real synths or strings, pianos or such. However, with some creativity, you can produce a whole trailer (or even a whole soundtrack) with this library. You are also able to create your own patches. The Trailer Giant patches are organised into Factory and Artists folders, which are further divided into Collections and Individual.  If you are using the Artists/Individual patches, you only load the sounds that are required for these presets, and so you save a lot of memory. If you want the full package – go for the Collections. Read more about how to use the patches right here. Interface The Trailer Giant  interface is nice and well organised. The only problem is that if you have a screen resolution of 2560×1440 like do, it’s really hard to read the names of the elements, and this is actually a problem that most interfaces have. Consequently, discovering all the knobs, dials, and buttons would need a bit of time (or a bit of reading the manual). What I also miss is a clearer control concept – some buttons don’t look like buttons at all, but rather like graphical…

Spitfire EFM RD01 Trailer Giant library


INSTALLATION§ – 100%


PATCHES – 95%


INTERFACE – 85%


SOUND – 100%


VALUE – 90%



94%

No, it’s not a “Make Instant Trailer” Library, but it offers you a plethora of great sounds and possibilities, making it a good addition to your trailer-sound toolbox. The price isn’t a bargain, but it’s fair.

94

Written by: Oliver Amberg

Oliver Amberg played in various metal bands (Coroner, Celtic Frost, Lick'n A Promise). His current bands are "The Boris Karloff Syndrome", "Artificial Rain" and "Postmortem Party". A couple of years ago he started to compose and produce music for film and games.

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