Music Software Review: Biscuit Tin Guitar by MODWHEEL [VIDEO]

MODWHEEL haven’t been around the sampling scene long, but this New Zealand based duo of composers and sound designers (whose work has included 9 of Peter Jackson’s films) have taken to capturing unique and distinctive instruments, as well as some more traditional ones in unique ways. We have previously reviewed their first library, The Lowdown, a 100 year old double bass sampled with a mixture of traditional and very non-traditional techniques and sounds. One of their latest offerings is the Biscuit Tin Guitar, extensively reviewed today by Chris Harris (AKA The Darris). Below is what MODWHEEL have to say about it, as it appears on their website:

The instrument that MODWHEEL has sampled for their Biscuit Tin Guitar library is a one off, hand crafted by Steve Roche. Steve has been making tin guitars and other odd instruments for many years for use in his soundtrack work with Plan 9 and live with the bands he performs with. This particular instrument is a 4 string fretless with open G Banjo tuning (D G B D). For sampling purposes, the range of the instrument has been extended down to the E below the D of its natural range. The instrument is fitted with a pickup and was recorded both acoustically as well as through a vintage Fender Twin Reverb amp. As an acoustic instrument, the Biscuit Tin Guitar has a wonderfully unique sound that is caught somewhere between a Dobro and a Banjo. The electric version can sit anywhere between clean and a tin can being dragged behind a car, depending on your taste.

What you get are 35 Kontakt patches, both acoustic and electric, with finger and plectrum Performance. Keyswitches operate the different note options i.e. Long, Short, Mute, Semitone Slide Up and Hammer Off. There is also dynamic keyswitching to aid performance with several velocity layers and at least 3 round robins. An FX panel on each patch gives the ability to adjust the sound to further suit your requirements. The instrument has also been used for its percussive possibilities and there are several percussion kits and BPM’d rhythm patchesIn addition there are a number of patches that play arpeggios and song patterns from a single key.

The Biscuit Tin Guitar is designed for the full version of Kontakt 5..3.0 (or higher), and comes in at a relatively modest 1.4 GB when installed. It’s priced at USD 49 , and can be purchased and downloaded directly from the MODWHEEL website.

Watch Chris’ review below:

 

 

MODWHEEL haven’t been around the sampling scene long, but this New Zealand based duo of composers and sound designers (whose work has included 9 of Peter Jackson’s films) have taken to capturing unique and distinctive instruments, as well as some more traditional ones in unique ways. We have previously reviewed their first library, The Lowdown, a 100 year old double bass sampled with a mixture of traditional and very non-traditional techniques and sounds. One of their latest offerings is the Biscuit Tin Guitar, extensively reviewed today by Chris Harris (AKA The Darris). Below is what MODWHEEL have to say about it, as it appears on their website: The instrument that MODWHEEL has sampled for their Biscuit Tin Guitar library is a one off, hand crafted by Steve Roche. Steve has been making tin guitars and other odd instruments for many years for use in his soundtrack work with Plan 9 and live with the bands he performs with. This particular instrument is a 4 string fretless with open G Banjo tuning (D G B D). For sampling purposes, the range of the instrument has been extended down to the E below the D of its natural range. The instrument is fitted with a pickup and was recorded both acoustically as well as through a vintage Fender Twin Reverb amp. As an acoustic instrument, the Biscuit Tin Guitar has a wonderfully unique sound that is caught somewhere between a Dobro and a Banjo. The electric version can sit anywhere between clean and a tin can being dragged behind a car, depending on your taste. What you get are 35 Kontakt patches, both acoustic and electric, with finger and plectrum Performance. Keyswitches operate the different note options i.e. Long, Short, Mute, Semitone Slide Up and Hammer Off. There is also dynamic keyswitching to aid performance with several velocity layers and at least 3 round robins. An FX panel on each patch gives the ability to adjust the sound to further suit your requirements. The instrument has also been used for its percussive possibilities and there are several percussion kits and BPM’d rhythm patches. In addition there are a number of patches that play arpeggios and song patterns from a single key. The Biscuit Tin Guitar is designed for the full version of Kontakt 5..3.0 (or higher), and comes in at a relatively modest 1.4 GB when installed. It’s priced at USD 49 , and can be purchased and downloaded directly from the MODWHEEL website. Watch Chris’ review below:

   

Biscuit Tin Guitar


Installation – 100%


Patches – 95%


Interface – 80%


Sound – 95%


Value – 100%



94%

94/100

Staying true to the roots of Modwheel’s approach with The Lowdown, The Biscuit Tin Guitar isn’t short of pure creativity and inspiring sounds. They have perfectly captured the character of this one-of-a-kind instrument into a set of tools that are sure to jump start your creative process and help you achieve that unique sound you are looking for.

94

Written by: Christopher Harris

Christopher Harris is a film composer in the San Francisco Bay Area who enjoys spending time with his family and playing video games. Chris regularly posts videos of product demos and composition tutorials on his Youtube channel.

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www.FilmandGameComposers.com offers a wide range of interviews, reviews, guides and tutorials for composers and musicians who are interested in writing music for film, TV and video games.

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